THE POWER OF STORYTELLING

THE POWER OF STORYTELLING

If effective storytelling is proven to persuade people to act, why then does storytelling struggle to permeate the world of consultancy?

Will cannabis usage become ubiquitous among US adults?

Will cannabis usage become ubiquitous among US adults?

New research from Kadence International has found that, 18% of Americans over the age of 21 have used cannabis in the last year. However, as cannabis becomes increasingly legal and destigmatized, more adults in the U.S. are willing to try it. Though 81% of American adults are not current cannabis users, 71% reported that they would be highly likely to try it in the next 12 months. In other words, only a mere 7% of adults living in the United States say they are unlikely to use cannabis in the next year.

Marijuana use has long been thought of as a recreational substance for a small portion of the population, which may be one of the reasons people have been holding back. This study identified a significant connection between wide-spread cannabis legalization and general attitudes about the substance. 41% of non-cannabis users stated that they’ve avoided marijuana because it’s illegal, but 70% of those stated that they would be likely to try cannabis if it were legalized where they live. As marijuana becomes less stigmatized due to the removal of legal barriers over the next few years, the large number of interested non-users are very likely to enter the fast-growing market space.

For those adults currently using cannabis, many are sticking to traditional methods. 2-in-3 cannabis users prefer to smoke marijuana compared to only 12% who prefer consuming edibles. They tend to prefer to smoke because they feel it is more convenient, but that may be an accessibility issue. Regardless of their method of consumption, over a third of adult cannabis users surveyed consume cannabis to help them relax and unwind after a long day.

While now recreationally legalized in a number of US states, discussing cannabis and its benefits is often done in hushed tones. The study we have conducted tries to demonstrate the role that cannabis has in modern society. This research study helps us understand the drivers of cannabis use in the United States, and while there is still a stigma attached to usage, a surprisingly large portion of the adult population is either using cannabis or strongly considering it in the coming year
— Miriam Konz, managing director at Kadence International

Given the overwhelming level of interest, it is easy to believe industry reports that say that the North American market will grow from $9.2 billion in 2017 to $47.3 billion a decade later.


REPUTATION

REPUTATION

In the last few years there has been a drive to define a brand’s purpose, the broader and generally grander reason for being for the brand: it isn’t there just for stockholder value, apparently, but to generate a real, positive impact in the world.

WHEN CHANGE IS DRIVEN BY CH-CH-CH-CH-CHANGES

WHEN CHANGE IS DRIVEN BY CH-CH-CH-CH-CHANGES

In 2016 we lost one of the greatest collaborators of all time. Arguably the key to David Bowie’s longevity was his ability to reinvent, not only through his own indisputable creative prowess…

BIG DATA

BIG DATA

Creeping digitisation of our world means life can be recorded and quantified in ways that would have been scarcely imaginable a decade ago.

SCRIPTING EVOLUTION

SCRIPTING EVOLUTION

Kadence International has recently partnered exclusively with Confirmit for our survey programming and data processing needs. Here, Boston’s own Constantin Rusu talks about the journey of adapting to the new platform and how it enhances our team’s creativity.

Quality Through Collaboration

Quality Through Collaboration

In the Strategy Day earlier in the year, everyone from the Kadence Singapore team met to discuss about the direction and strategies for the office in 2018.

The Luxury 'Iceberg'

The Luxury 'Iceberg'

What we define as ‘luxury’ can differ so much from person to person, let alone across markets and cultures.

GDPR – Fear, Follow or Flourish

GDPR – Fear, Follow or Flourish

2018 is going to see big changes to how Europe (and the world as a whole) will have to deal with peoples Personal Information with the replacement of multiple Data Protection Acts with a single encompassing General Data Protection Regulation that comes into effect on 25th May 2018.

How to manage the overflow of news!

How to manage the overflow of news!

Having recently had Chinese New Year, a celebration of clearing out the old to make way for the new – and as we approach Spring in the Western world, with the concept of a spring clean – I was reviewing my various news sources and taking stock. There is an enormous amount of content available. Every few minutes someone I follow is posting new content to their blogs, articles or in LinkedIn groups. I have 3 international and 2 local news apps on my phones. Facebook and Twitter also pop up constantly with news stories. Then there is the business press where I have a magazine subscription as well as articles sent to me by clients and colleagues. There is so so so much, it is hard to know how to focus attention. Much in the same way as my spring clean at home. I seem to accumulated some much stuff – but do I use it all? Its time to take action! 

An article in Forbes a few years ago looked at how much content you need to read to ‘be successful’. https://www.forbes.com/sites/brettnelson/2012/06/04/do-you-read-fast-enough-to-be-successful. Assuming to be ‘good’ at business, you need to read a few news stories, a few business articles and perhaps a good book once a month. But there is also Newsletters, breaking news, LinkedIn pages etc. 

At the average rate of 300 words per minute, to stay ‘up to date’ you would need to “set aside at least 2 hours of reading every day just to keep up.

This does not even include your work emails…or indeed actual work! The article does go on to say you can look to increase your average words per minute (and so be able to consume the content in less time) but where to start? 

Probably not with the news.

It turns out the news itself could actually be damaging our health. A recent article in Time magazine - http://time.com/5125894/is-reading-news-bad-for-you/ shows that more than half of Americans report that the news causes stress. “Many report feeling anxiety, fatigue or sleep loss as a result of the news” In the article Loretta Breuning, a former professor of management at the University of California, East Bay explains that “the human brain is attracted to troubling information because it’s programmed to detect threats, not to overlook them. This can make it hard for us to ignore the negatives and seek out the positives around us,” 

As such, a plan of attack is required. There is never enough time in the day – so how do we stay up to date with what matters, whilst not overloading and making ourselves ill? 

Here are my tips for successfully managing content around you. 

1. The most important aspect is to recognise what types of content there is and to come to terms with when you should read it. For me, these are the content types I look out for

  • Headlines & general news
  • Industry news
  • Specific client news
  • Wider business interest
  • Sport
  • Interesting articles
  • Leisure reading

2. For each of the types of content, I try to engage with them at different times of the day. And for a set period of time. I do this by dividing the content up by how ‘useful’ it is to me at a given time. 
- Time sensitive. Headlines, specific client news, sport are all only relevant in the moment. 
- Occasion dependent. Industry news, wider business interest. Interesting articles. Will all increase my overall knowledge – but are all far less time sensitive. Meaning I can fit them into a suitable occasion. 

For me the Time sensitive catch ups happen early morning, before work. I have 2 dogs so walking the dogs and catching up on the time sensitive news is my way of kick starting my day. Any follow ups etc I can set a reminder on my phone as I go. Around 30-45min is enough to get set for the day. 

Throughout the day I then have 3 potential periods to fit content in. 

  1. Mid-morning. I often try and complete some priority tasks when I first get into the office. However, around 11ish, it is time for a coffee and 10min to catch up on any industry news. 
  2. Lunchtime. I save interesting articles or more in-depth industry summaries to lunch time when I have more time.
  3. Evening – This is a time ear marked for leisure reading. Switching off and reading something that has nothing to do with work is a far better way of unwinding than anything that might spark an action point for work! 

Then when on long trips, holidays or weekends – this is the time to catch up on wider business interest books, articles or blogs.

There is so much content available – but only at certain times can I get around to the ones that are genuinely interesting. But what I need to get around to right now – is spring cleaning my house that I have been putting off!