It’s undeniable that in developing markets, the scarcity and infrastructure of water and electricity resources is a cause of worry, both from a cost and a routine perspective. Consumers in these developing markets are more often defined by their circumstances. There is a preference for semi-automatic twin tubs because the volume of water and the source can be controlled by the user i.e. not having to rely on water coming from the pipe. In markets where disruption of water can happen, being able to use rainwater, for example, is appealing.

The scarcity and infrastructure of water and electricity resources is a cause of worry, both from a cost and a routine perspective.

The unreliability of electricity also has bearing on household appliance usage. For example, it would be risky to store large quantities of food in refrigerator. Hence there is little reason to invest in better technology and pay steep prices for electricity to meet their food storage needs. Similarly, electricity consumption has impact on laundry behaviour, where there is worry of the potential to overload the electricity system and cause an outage, disrupting their laundry routines.

It would be worth embracing a much more systemic approach that looks at factors beyond the more immediate factors relevant to the Samsung brand, the people that we’re designing for, technological constraints, and business needs. There is a need to also take into account greater macro factors - social, economic, political, environmental, in order to help us understand how consumers’ realities and behaviours have evolved, and the potential trajectory of this evolution.